In The News

2019 Email Security Report INKY Technology Corporation, an email protection startup that leverages the power of unique computer vision and artificial intelligence (AI), announced the release of the company’s 2018 Q4 email security report, Welcome to 2019: Phishing Gets Personal. The holiday period is typically the peak time of year for online shopping, and with that comes higher rates of cyber-crime, especially phishing scams. This Q4 of 2018 was a busy period for phishing scammers. INKY researchers saw a spike in email volume this time of year as people use email to gather their receipts from online shopping, shipping notifications, returns, and virtual holiday greetings. INKY pulled out the highest volume attack types and broke down each one. The majority of attacks that were analyzed showed an increase in target personalization, making them considerably more difficult to detect. Read full article.
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INKY Recognized in Top Stories from Cybersecurity Month in Maryland October was Cybersecurity Month in Maryland and throughout the month, the state’s cybersecurity sector made headlines. Maryland Commerce rolled out two tax credit programs designed to spur investment and growth in the cyber sector. The Cybersecurity Investment Incentive Tax Credit provides an incentive for those investing in Maryland cybersecurity companies and the Buy Maryland Cybersecurity Tax Credit incentivizes purchases of security technology and products from Maryland companies. Read full article.
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This email protection startup just released its flagship anti-phishing solution Rockville, Md.-based INKY makes a cloud-based email security platform powered by unique computer vision, artificial intelligence and machine learning. The company has a main goal to stop attacks on company inboxes, allow people to have confidence in the messages they are receiving and know that the people interacting with them are who they say they are, INKY Cofounder and CEO Dave Baggett told Technical.ly. Baggett also cofounded ITA Software, the airfare search company purchased by Google in 2011 for $730 million which now powers Google Flights. INKY has been in business selling its email security solution for about a year. This week, the company announced the release of its flagship product INKY Phish Fence, which detects phishing attacks using computer vision, artificial intelligence and machine learning. The software is designed to protect enterprises from widespread phishing, spear phishing and extortion attacks. Read full article.
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AI-Facilitated Product Aims to Stop Spear-Phishing Attacks Phishing -- from bulk spam phishing to more targeted spear-phishing and business email compromise (BEC) attacks -- is the number one attack vector faced by business today. According to Wombat, 76% of organizations experienced phishing attacks in 2017. According to Symantec, by the end of 2017 the average user received 16 malicious emails per month. According to the FBI, global BEC losses from October 2013 to December 2016 had reached $5.3 billion -- a figure that Trend Micro believes could expand to $9 billion for 2018 alone. INKY, founded in 2008 by Dave Baggett and Simon Smith, has today launched a new AI-based anti-phishing product: INKY Phish Fence. The product is designed to recognize phishing emails. It integrates with Office 365 and Google Cloud services. Incoming mail can be marked clean, suspicious or malicious. Such emails can be dropped, quarantined, or delivered with an inserted banner (yellow or red) to warn the user. Read full article.
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INKY emerges from stealth with email spoofing, phishing protection service INKY, a startup that provides protection against email spoofing and phishing services, emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday and announced its “INKY Phish Fence” product. The product helps organizations detect spoofing attempts whereby attackers hijack a domain to pose as a credible entity. It also uses “anomaly detection algorithms” to warn employees of suspicious emails and detect spearpshing and extortion attempts. Read full article.
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AI based anti-phishing company INKY receives $5.6 Million from ClearSky Security, BlackStone and Gula Tech Adventures Inky Technology Corporation, the leading email security company based in Rockville, Maryland, announces today that ClearSky Security led the Series A round to invest $5.6 million to enhance analytics capabilities of the software and expand sales and marketing. Gula Tech Adventures also participated in the round, and Blackstone has joined as a strategic investor. ClearSky Security Managing Director Peter Kuper has joined CEO/founder Dave Baggett, co-founder Simon Smith, and The Kroger Co. CIO Chris Hjelm on the company's board of directors. Read full article.
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It Is Time To Upgrade The Cybersecurity Tools Businesses Use Back during the Dot-com boom – or what many of us now refer to as the Dot-com bubble – of the mid '90s, many exciting advents were shaping the foundation of the modern web. In 1993, the Mosaic browser made the Internet accessible to everyday users by making data “pretty” with color and simple graphics. This advent, along with the growing popularity of the home Windows and Mac, spurred rapid adoption of Internet service Read full article.
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INKY Protects Businesses From Phishing Attacks By Mixing Artificial Intelligence TL; DR: Using a unique blend of technologies, Inky’s Phish Fence mail protection gateway shields users from sophisticated phishing attacks. The program alerts users to emails disguised to look like they’ve been sent internally, and detects strange characters and sketchy links, sending users warnings so they’re educated about phishing attempts. The tool is easy to set up and allows administrators access to a dashboard that shows them the threats that exist in their organization Read full article.
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How to stop spear-phishing cold Many hacks start with a spear-phishing attack, often aimed at the top of the corporate hierarchy. How do I hack thee? Let me count the ways. Among others, I hack thee to the depth and breadth and height of a spear-phishing attack (apologies to Elizabeth Barrett Browning). By now, you may be aware that many of the most devastating hacks that have occurred in recent history—the Democratic National Committee (DNC), Yahoo, the W-2 scam—have been launched from a base of information or access garnered by sending a poisoned email with tailored details to a specific individual, who then becomes the vector for the rest of the attack. Read full article.
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